From nothing to something and back

I let go and enter the domain of no one.

Heaven and Earth are one.
The circle and square are equals.

They separate as necessary without effort.
First boundless stillness, then endless movement.

It makes no sense to talk about form or formlessness.
Substance or no substance – what’s the difference?

Body, energy and mind – what are they?
I am just a conduit of the forces of Nature.

My mind drives and fills out Form.
Empty but full, it pervades the Universe.

I stand in the Center.
Watching the Master and the servant at work.

When we offer no resistance,
we meet no resistance.

Miracles and Mystery.
The mundane stuff is welcomed like a friend.

I have no mind of my own.
Eventually this will fall away too.

Perfection in imperfection.
Imperfection in perfection.

It seems as if I am there, but I am not.
I am not, but am I right here.

Others cannot fathom it.
I cannot fathom it either.

Naturally – it’s ok.

(Poem about the liberation of mind, heart and intention “Shen, Xin and Yi” in spiritual work like: Standing Meditation, Qigong, Neigong, Neijia and Taiji )

Substantiality and Insubstantiality

How can substantiality and insubstantiality be distinguished between left and right or between top and bottom parts of the body?

The muscles, the skeleton and the nerves are parts of the body system. When practicing the movements, the use of consciousness to sink and relax the body is most important. The centre of gravity is moved while preserving the uprightness of the central axis of the body. It is important to focus on steadiness, tranquillity, relaxation and rootedness. The movements propel the external movements in a continuous or uninterrupted fashion. Internal force is generated with turning movements. After a long time, the whole body is in balance. When left and right is distinguished, one is substantial and the other insubstantial along the pattern of “cross alignment”. For instance, together with the distinction between top and bottom parts of the body, when the left upper part of the body is substantial, the left lower part is insubstantial and similarly when the right upper part of the body is substantial, the right lower part is insubstantial. This pattern of cross alignment is used in shifts of the centre of gravity from one leg to the other. This is similar to the “cross-roads” of the nervous system. When moving Qi, therefore, one must separate substantial from insubstantial, move the step without moving the body or moving the body and not the hand. If in moving a step, the body also moves, then it is not separating substantial from insubstantial. If in moving the body, the hand also moves, then the shoulder and the hands are not relaxed. It is important to follow the principles of using consciousness to propel movement. The top and bottom, left and right portions of the body must be coordinated. A rounded grinding stone may move but the centre is not moving. All parts of the body become one system characterized by lightness and agility, roundness and smoothness, even respiration, alternate opening and closing like that of the sea where with movement from one part of the sea, all parts are also moved. The movements are guided by consciousness and are properly regulated like the regular movements of the waves in the sea.

Reference: Interview with Master Huang www.paulrenalltaiji.info

Links: Yin Yang

Cobra Breathing Exercise

The cobra breath is a tantric breathing exercise. In essence, it is an energy-building breath. One uses breath to move kundalini energy up from the root chakra, at the base of the spine, to the crown chakra which lies at the crown of the head.The particular form cobra breath outlined below is used to expand consciousness, and it can lead to states of bliss and joy. Moving kundalini energy through the body is also rejuvenating for organs and aiding cellular processes. Follow the steps below to experience the cobra breath.

Instructions

1. Sit on the edge of a chair, with the edge your buttocks resting on the seat. You may put your hands on your knees if desired.You can also sit with your back against the wall and use a pillow to support your lower back.

2. Press your tongue on the roof of your mouth. Squeeze your anal muscles, or perineum, and hold.

3. Breathe in. As you breathe in, first feel the energy come up from the base of your spine and up your spine. It should progress to the back of your head and around the top to the crown of your head. Keep your tongue pressed on the roof of the mouth, and make sure your anal muscles stay contracted.

4. As you breathe out, keep your tongue on the roof of your mouth.

5. Slowly, breathe out and make a hissing noise like a snake. Your facial muscles around your jaw and lips should be contracted, almost as if you are smiling, when breathing out.

Reference:How to Do the Cobra Breathing Exercise ehow.com

Links:
Ujjayi breath wikipedia.org

Tao Yoga

Tao Yoga Kamakura – http://www.taoyoga.jp

Tao Yoga or DaoYin exercises were an ancient precursor of Qigong, specifically the variety sometimes known as neigong, and were practised in Chinese Taoist monasteries for health and spiritual cultivation in ancient times. 

In modern times DaoYin has often been refered to as — Taoist Yoga. DaoYin can be translated as “Guiding or leading the flow of Blood and Qi in the Body” and we find references to this ancient exercises from as far back as 500 BC. 

Ancient DaoYin is also said to be a primary formative ingredient in the well-known soft style Chinese martial art T’ai Chi Ch’uan. There are many various sets of DaoYin: Five Animals Play, Heavenly Gate, Su Dongpo’s Massage, Seven Star Standing Exercises, Chen Huashan’s 12 Forms, Wang Ziqiao’s 34 Forms, and many others.

Here we present a set of 12 Tao Yoga or DaoYin movements for interested students. This second video lists exercises 9 – 12. We use this set of 12 exercises as a foundation training set.

It works to lengthen the tendons, open the joints, develop flexibility, stamina, massage the internal organs, regulate the breath, open the channels, circulate qi naturally, and begin to awaken the Dan Tian.

A very basic set, but it can give you a lot if you really practice it. It is a kind of basic skill developing exercise. 

In these films, we only performed a few movements of each exercise due to time limitations. Each exercise should be done 9 / 18 / or 36 times each.

On Breathing. 

Do not hold the breath when doing these exercises. 

Breath deeply and full and draw the inhalation and exhalation from the Dan Tian or lower abdomen. 

Generally you can inhale as you rise up, and exahale as you bend down – generally. 

When you practice, please feel a connection from the feet to the earth, as if rooted. 

Feel a connection to the sky with the crown of the head, as if a string is connected to above. 

Let the tongue touch the hard pallet of the mouth, and the teeth are lightly closed. 

Breath in and out gently through the nose.

Please have a slight focus to the Lower Dantian when you close the hands at the end of each exercise. 

Allow a feeling of all things settling in to the Lower Dan Tian and feel very grounded and centered.

The Lower Dantian (Tan Tien) is located in the empty space below the navel in the middle place between the kidney and navel — a sphere of around 3.8 cm. 

Let the internal vision gaze upon that place when you settle. 

Let golden virtue begin to grow within, releasing all negative qualities and deeply relaxing the body. 

Let all things return to and settle there in between each movement.

As you practice more, forget about breathing, and let the movement and yourself become one with the surrounding nature. 

Let virtue fill your heart, and gain union with all of heaven and earth as you practice.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.taoyoga.jp

Qigong

“Qigong” (literally “breath exercise”), an invaluable component of traditional Chinese medicine, has its origin in ancient times. Its primarystimulus was the search for longevity with the ultimate aim of immortality,which has much entranced the Chinese mind from ancient times. Therecords shows the exercises to help the qi (the human body’s vital energy)circulating freely and to nourish the internal organs dated to the ShangDynasty (16th -11th century AD). The actual practice of qigong began inthe fourth century AD. Since then the search by physician and patient forgreater health, techniques of religious cultivation and the martial artist’squest for better training methods all contributed greatly to its developmentand enrichment over the following centuries. The Taoist, Buddhist,Confucian, Medical and Martial schools of practice developed. Qigonghas been passed down from generation to generation.

Generally, qigong is divided into two types. One is the quiescent type(jinggong 静功),which is meant to be performed standing, sitting, orlying down using special breathing techniques by which the practionerlearns to focus his mind. The other one is the mobile type (donggong 动功),which practices a set of movements and massage while keeping aproper balance between mind and emotion, qi and strength. Internally,qigong can enhance the spirit, the qi and the mind. Externally, it canstrengthen the tendons, bones and skin. The structure and style of qigonghas close relations with the introspective observation that is typical of Chinese culture. For example qigong takes harmony as its guidingprinciple, classical Chinese philosophy as its theoretical base, the use of will power as its fundamental means, a combination of dong (motion) andjing (stillness) as its form of expression, man’s longevity as its goal.

Qigong has had various forms, and its name and emphasis may havevaried according to the form. However, its oldest and most diverse form isTaoyin (导引),which holds an important position in the traditionalChinese art of preserving one’s health. Tao refers to the fact that physicalmovements are guided by the strength of the mind and in turn stimulatethe internal flow of qi within the body. Yin means that with the aid ofphysical movements, qi can reach the bodily extremities (for example, thefingers, feet and head). In this way the flow of “qi” links the zang 脏(solid organs) and fu (腑) (hollow organs) or qi being transmittedthrough the body. Sometimes this can be released from the body, and thenit is known as external qi.

The basic methods of Taoyin (导引)are kai (开)(opening), he (合)(closing), xuan (旋) (rotating), rou (揉) (rubbing), tui (推) (pushing),an (按) (pressing), and fen (分) (separating. There are many posturesand movements in Taoyin exercises, but the emphasis is on achieving astate of harmony between body and mind. This can be done with the helpof the movements, not solely because of the movements themselves, andwhen you reach a certain level in practice, you can even “forget what youare doing, and this is gaining the true essence of qigong and forgettingphysical movements.” This state of harmony culminates in the practice ofjinggong (静功) (static exercises.

Taoyin has many differences from gymnastics and other modern sports,as Taoyin exercises are based on mental activity and therefore it is possibleto accumulate and conserve one’s energy while practicing Taoyin exercises.However, the practice of modern sports requires showing off one’sstrength and skill, and therefore the consumption of energy.

Another form of “jinggong” exercises is tuna (吐纳) (exhaling andinhaling), otherwise known as tiaoxi (调息) (regulating breath) or xiqi (吸气) (absorbing qi) . this is a synthesis of different breathing skills. The basic train of thinking for these exercises is that as far as possible oneshould expel the stale and stagnated air and inhale fresh air, thusimproving the functioning of the internal organs to resist senility andprolong life.

Tuna skills can be divided into three basic categories: Koubi huxi(breathing through the mouth or nose), Fushi huxi (abdominal breathing),other methods of breathing and regulation in conjunction with mentalactivity such as chongqi (filling the body with qi), dantian huxi (directingqi to dantian, a region two or three centimeters below the navel), zhongxi(directing qi to the heel), and guixi (breathing like a tortoise).

Unique to China only, Qigong exercise become an integral part of theChinese culture. Qigong exercise can produce a myriad of beneficialeffects, of which the most common are preventing and curing diseases,strengthening the constitution, avoiding premature aging, and prolonginglife. Qigong exercise requires one to relax, to be calm, natural and freefrom distraction, so that it can remove “stress”, and dispel tension. Qigongexercise helps to keep the main and collateral channels in good shape toestablish harmony between vital energy and blood, to balance between yinand yang, and improve coordination of the nervous system, so thatprotective inhibition of the cerebral cortex can be enhanced. Qigongexercise helps to reduce fundamental metabolism, increase the capacity ofstoring energy, apply massage to the abdomen and improve appetite andbring good digestion. Qigong exercise helps to tap the body potentialities,stimulate positive factors, and enhance one’s self-control. Therefore, itbecomes an effective measure to attain health and longevity. Qigongmasters and medical practitioners have developed a theory from a wealthof experience and practice of qigong over many centuries. The modernscientific research and evaluation of qigong exercise has attractedincreasing attention from all circles around the world. This may bring thebenefits of qigong intellectual to light, but it may leave mechanisticdogmatism to qigong phenomena.

Reference: A Brief Introduction of Chinese History & Culture by Liang Zhigang, QingTao Press Sept. 2001

A real human being

I dwell in spiritual tipsiness, looking into the meaning of mellowness.

I do not know why there is a profound smile on my lips,
neither do I care to find out.

Lighting up me entire body,
filling it to the brim with nothing.

I die to my self.

Not knowing who I am,
or where I am.

Lost to the world,
entering Heaven.

Walking the earth,
returning from bliss.

The spark of tipsiness has lit my life.
How can anything be the same.

Learning how to die moment by moment. In an instant a real human being.

The Value of Boredom

Learn to enjoy boredom and monotony. When you feel bored, it means that it is a really good time and everything is in good condition. This is the most valuable time for you. Most people are unpleasant when things are boring, because they do not know the value of boredom and monotony. Monotony to them is too simple, and they cannot stand it. Those things you consider boring and monotonous can help you come back to yourself instead of pulling you away. By accepting them, you can nurture yourself.

Reference:
Entering the Tao: Master Ni’s Teachings on Self-cultivation
by Hua-Ching Ni
ISBN 9781570621611