Taoist Technique of the Third Eye

Ancient Remote Viewing.

Dr. Baolin Wu, M.D.(China), Ph.D., L.Ac. is a Chinese medical doctor, Taoist physician, and martial artist with over thirty years of medical experience. A recognized authority on traditional Chinese medicine as well as conventional Western medicine, he combines and redefines the techniques of both systems and is able to apply appropriate treatment to complex medical situations.

While Dr. Wu is a skilled practitioner of acupuncture and Chinese herbal science, what sets him apart is his advanced expertise in medical Qi Kung, which he applies to many difficult and otherwise “untreatable” conditions.

Dr. Wu is a Taoist Master from the White Cloud Monastery in Beijing, which for almost a thousand years has been one of the most respected centers in China for the study and practice of Taoist philosophy and medicine. At age four he was brought to the monastery and cured of leukemia. He spent the next twenty years under the direct tutelage of the abbot of the monastery, learning techniques of which few people today are even aware,

Taoist meditation methods have many points in common with Hindu and Buddhist systems, but the Taoist way is less abstract and far more down-to-earth than the contemplative traditions which evolved in India. The primary hallmark of Taoist meditation is the generation, transformation, and circulation of internal energy. Once the meditator has ‘achieved energy’ (deh-chee), it can be applied to promoting health and longevity, nurturing the ‘spiritual embryo’ of immortality, martial arts, healing, painting and poetry, sensual self-indulgence, or whatever else the adept wishes to do with it.

The two primary guidelines in Taoist meditation are jing (‘quiet, stillness, calm’) and ding (‘concentration, focus’). The purpose of stillness, both mental and physical, is to turn attention inwards and cut off external sensory input, thereby muzzling the “Five Thieves”. Within that silent stillness, one concentrates the mind and focuses attention, usually on the breath, in order to develop what is called ‘one-pointed awareness’, a totally undistracted, undisturbed, undifferentiated state of mind which permits intuitive insights to arise spontaneously.

Reference:
Taoist Technique youtube.com